Buttons: Top Navigation Bar
<br />
<b>Deprecated</b>:  mysql_connect(): The mysql extension is deprecated and will be removed in the future: use mysqli or PDO instead in <b>/mnt/stor8-wc2-dfw1/488688/www.dual-diagnosis.net/web/content/tos/configuration.php</b> on line <b>35</b><br />
care diagnosis dual managed addiction drug drugrehab rehab treatment addiction treatment seattle alcohol horse rehab
dual diagnosis management and holistic addiction treatment alcohol ct drug in rehab
1-800-559-9503 - drug rehab center in los angeles
Home > Depression > Depression in Women
Depression, Not Just a Bad Mood Depression

Depression is a psychiatric disorder that is characterized by extreme feelings of sadness, anehedonia (or loss of pleasure), guilt, helplessness or hopelessness, an inability to concentrate, an increase or decrease of appetite, and thoughts of death. Depressive illness often interferes with an individual's normal functioning and often goes without being diagnosed for long periods of time causing a lot of problems for the both the individual with the illness and those around them.
Depression involves the body, mood and thoughts. It affects the way a person eats and sleeps, the way one feels about themselves and the way one approaches life in general.

 
Quick Facts   Symptoms
Types of Depression   Causes of Depression  
Depression in Women   Depression in Men  
Depression in the Elderly Depression in Children  
Treatment   Help For Depression  
 
Depression in Women
Women experience depression about twice as often as men.1 Many hormonal factors may contribute to the increased rate of depression in women-particularly such factors as menstrual cycle changes, pregnancy, miscarriage, postpartum period, pre-menopause, and menopause. Many women also face additional stresses such as responsibilities both at work and home, single parenthood, and caring for children and for aging parents.

A recent NIMH study showed that in the case of severe Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS), women with a preexisting vulnerability to PMS experienced relief from mood and physical symptoms when their sex hormones were suppressed. Shortly after the hormones were re-introduced, they again developed symptoms of PMS. Women without a history of PMS reported no effects of the hormonal manipulation.

Many women are also particularly vulnerable after the birth of a baby. The hormonal and physical changes, as well as the added responsibility of a new life, can be factors that lead to postpartum depression in some women. While transient "blues" are common in new mothers, a full-blown depressive episode is not a normal occurrence and requires active intervention. Treatment by a sympathetic physician and the family's emotional support for the new mother are prime considerations in aiding her to recover her physical and mental well-being and her ability to care for and enjoy the infant.
Depression
Bipolar Disorder
Anxiety Disorders
Panic Disorders
Obsessive Disorder
PTSD
Schizophrenia
Social Phobia
BPD
Specific Phobias
Gad
References

Live chat by Boldchat

Meth Addiction Resources Finda A Treatment Center
HomeSpacer Spacer SpacerSpacerSpacer
©2010 Dual Diagnosis, All Rights reserved